verb conjugation

Follow the links to the verb paradigms

  1. glanaim – shows the general 1st conjugation paradigm with a broad stem
  2. cuirim – shows the general 1st conjugation paradigm with a slender stem, and also illustrates the lenition of t endings after an -r stem
  3. gheibhim – an irregular verb
  4. táim – the substantive verb, also irregular
  5. éistim – a 1st conjugation verb that illustrates some of the peculiarities of vowel-initial verbs
  6. crúim – a 1st conjugation verb originally with a medial -dh- rendered irregular by the new spelling.
  7. ním – a 1st conjugation verb originally with a medial -gh- rendered irregular by the new spelling.
  8. ceannaím – a 2nd conjugation verb with a broad stem.
  9. imím – a 2nd conjugation verb with a slender stem.
  10. codlaim – a 1st conjugation syncopating verb that is now usually 2nd conjugation.
  11. foghlamaím – a 2nd conjugation syncopating verb.
  12. maraím – a 2nd conjugation syncopating verb with a medial -bh-.
  13. chím – an irregular verb.
  14. deinim – an irregular verb.
  15. deirim – an irregular verb.
  16. beirim – an irregular verb.
  17. ithim – an irregular verb.
  18. gabhaim – an irregular verb that shares some of its forms with the irregular verb, gheibhim.
  19. cloisim – a verb that is irregular in the past tense.
  20. tugaim – a verb that is irregular in some tenses.
  21. insim – a verb that is irregular in some tenses.
  22. tagaim – an irregular verb.
  23. seasaím – a verb where the -mh of the verbal noun reappears in the preterite and imperative.
  24. téim – an irregular verb.
  25. tarraingím – an irregular verb whose forms are confused with another verb.

3 Responses to verb conjugation

  1. Dave Smith says:

    I have taken the liberty of saving your file here as html, and modifying the IPA to MLS.
    In the process, I noticed some dubious IPA transliterations, which I corrected in the MLS version in half of the cases, leaving the other case in IPA to stand. I marked the cases, both modified, and standing in red.
    Give me an eMail address, and I will send the modified file to you as an attachment.
    Best regards,
    Dave.

  2. jedchandler says:

    Can anyone help me, please? I am relearning Irish, but from a background of having a Cork Irish father who taught me a few basics of the language. As I recall, he used a far more inflected conjugation – for example the second person singular of glanaim would be glanair. I’m going to Cork for a few days this summer and I would very much like to use the language there, however imperfectly. But would my verbs place me as something which has emerged unbidden from the distant past? (I am 60, and my father was 52 when I was born, so we really are talking ancient history here!)

    • gleannghaibhle says:

      People would still use those forms, but mainly older speakers. They’d be more common after conjunctions like go, e.g. fan go bhfeicir.

      They’re still there in Kerry Irish as well.

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